Military Carbon Arc Searchlights were manufactured from 1932 to 1942.  Carbon Arc light is
made by the burning of two carbon rods.  Each rod is fed towards each other.  When the arc is
struck the result is the most powerful man made light ever.  The ultraviolet rays are directly
comparable to pure sunshine.

The Carbon Arc Searchlight is a great way to advertise.  Carbon arc searchlights have been
known to draw attention from well over 30 miles away.  Searchlights increase traffic to your
evening event by creating awareness and excitement.  People have a natural curiosity to track
down the light to see what's going on!  If you are a business in a hard to find location, the light
will put you on the map.

The light can be set up almost anywhere.  The generator and the light are mounted on the
same trailer.  All I need is 40 feet of level parking for the truck and trail
er.

Don't be fooled by those little multi-beam lights (Like the one at your local casino).
On the average these little lights look pretty nice for a few blocks, maybe 1.5 miles at best in
the city.  They are fine for localized event atmosphere, but if you need the power to attract
people to your event, these little lights just don't  have the candlepower the carbon arc has to
draw attention from many miles away.

My WW II Carbon arc searchlight is over 3 times brighter and more than twice the beam width
of those little multi-beam type light units.


Interesting Facts:

In 1942 the cost to the military for this light was $60,000.

The light is 60" in diameter, Made of aluminum, and puts out 800,000,000 candlepower, which
will penetrate an average distance of 60,000 feet.

On a clear night the light can be seen 30 miles away.

Power is furnished by the portable generator that is part of the unit.  It uses a 6-Cylinder
Hercules Engine and consumes 3 gallons of gasoline an hour.

The light has gone through a total restoration.  I have seen many lights in the past and this is
definitely the best  Carbon Arc searchlight in the Midwest.  No money was spared on this
awesome light!
What is Carbon Arc?